Update on the water situation: Still need a special pump, but now I know I have to get it myself.

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“It” = “IT”

….that’s not my joke, but it’s appropriate.

 

UPDATE 9/21: My admin account isn’t ‘elevated’ enough to install programs or make changes, my internet is abnormally slow and buggy, and I can no longer connect my speakers to the computer.

*Throws hands up and walks out of the room*

 

I recently discovered that there is no way to videoconference from my work computer, particularly via Zoom. So I decided to install Skype as a temporary Band-Aid for the situation. To install programs, I need to go to IT for admin privileges.

It’s a bad idea to give IT your computer unless you REALLY have to, and today is a good example why.

Continue reading “It” = “IT”

A whole lot of nothing here.

Well, I still only have water a couple of hours and with very low pressure. I need some sort of extra pump, which somebody is required by law to provide me. But there’s laws and there’s laws.

But my toilet tank is filling up, and that makes all the difference in the world. Plus this apartment is rather a lot bigger and better than the other, and the view is the best.

There really isn’t much to say. It’s been a week of running around trying to resolve things that remain unresolved. Apartment things.

The lady at the water company complained loudly about how if I live here, I should speak French. Folks, how about not saying that to US immigrants? It’s not helpful, and it’s super painful because everyone’s making as much effort as they can and these things don’t happen overnight thank you. You can help by speaking a little slower, because French tutorials don’t have the Ivorian accent.

Continue reading A whole lot of nothing here.

Lebanese Food, Moving, etc.

We went into Abidjan for haircuts, shopping, and birthday lunch. It was particularly interesting.

We got off the bus at the typical Total station (gas station).
“Go over to the road,” LM said. “There’s a taxi that MM wants that looks clean.”
We approach the taxi as the driver sticks a little glass bottle with a green liquid up his nose. By the time I had gathered my thoughts enough to comment, we had negotiated the fare and were getting in. I figured that if they didn’t protest, then maybe it was medication?

But let’s face it: medication is rarely colored neon green.

Continue reading Lebanese Food, Moving, etc.

Something new today: a guy selling live little catfish, wrapped around sticks like those bell sticks people shake during Jingle Bells, in a wheelbarrow of muddy water.